Now or never for fast rail: watch that real estate!

This study says get to it or developers and real estate prices will make it impossible!

Fast trains could overtake new airport

September 18, 2010

A new study puts the case for high-speed rail, writes Adele Ferguson.

A high-speed rail network allowing a 10-minute trip between Sydney and Campbelltown and 50 minutes to Canberra would avoid the $15 billion cost of developing a second Sydney airport, a new study reveals.

The study, obtained exclusively by the Herald, argues that at speeds of 350km/h, high-speed rail becomes competitive with air travel. It estimates that travel from Sydney to Melbourne would take three hours.

The issue of a high-speed train has recently been resurrected by all sides of politics as a potential solution to Australia’s crippling road congestion, the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and a population that is expected to increase to 26.7 million by 2026 and 36 million by 2056.

Released jointly by AECOM, one of the world’s experts on modelling fast trains for governments, and the infrastructure lobby group, Infrastructure Partnerships Australia (IPA), the study urges the government to identity the new routes and then buy the land or put in place planning protections to ensure future land price rises don’t make a high-speed rail network a prohibitive option.

The modelling indicates the land corridor is valued at $13.7 billion at today’s prices but will balloon to $57 billion by 2030.

via Fast trains could overtake new airport.

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